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#1 2006-04-14 18:16:17

Gosia
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Artykuły na temat North & South

Zamieszczam tekst listu scenarzystki N&S Sandy Welch.
Byl zamieszczony na forum angielskim N&S

The following is the text of a letter received from Sandy Welch, script-writer of North and South, in February 2005 in response to a set of questions sent by the members of the BBC North and South message board.

Letter from Sandy Welch

Firstly, let me say how much we all appreciate the support and enthusiasm generated on the North and South BBC website. Although sometimes a little scary..(the week between Pts 3 + 4 springs to mind-when it seemed everyone had by then read the book and thought we might mess up the ending.. I had to check the last scene several times to reassure myself you all weren’t going to be disappointed..!) …..I’m sure I’m not alone on the production team in being touched by the close interest and attention to the series. We all have a sort of instinct as to what an audience might want to watch but it’s rare to get such positive and detailed feedback, so thank you all, very much.

1) I first read North and South when I was in my late teens, slightly later than my other ‘favourite’ Victorian novels but I’ve often reread it with pleasure. Phillippa Giles ,the Executive producer and a great friend and collaborator on much of my adaptation work, mentioned it to me one day ,and, as often happens, played the devil’s advocate in wondering whether it was possible to dramatise it. I said, yes, of course you can, and by the end of the conversation had managed ,once again, to talk my way into it.

As to a ‘starting point’, there are always scenes in the novel which must be included in any dramatisation and the particular format (how many episodes etc) will often dictate a sort of rhythm. North and South has a very strong love story, strong lead characters and an equally strong narrative which are huge advantages. It also has an unambiguous title. Disadvantages are that it doesn’t have very much ‘South’, there are two of them (London and Helstone) and most of the early important ‘South ‘scenes have to happen before the Hales move to Milton. This is why the story opens with Margaret on the train, thinking back on a succession of ‘Southern’ scenes , to give a sense of momentum to the story and to try to achieve a cohesiveness in the London /Helstone scenes, ie the life she’s leaving behind. It is also, of course, Margaret’s story , and there were particular problems in realising her character because much of the story development (especially her opinion of Thornton) takes place inside her head. She doesn’t confide her feelings to anybody, even Bessie, and probably Mr Bell is the only one to correctly identify them. In her letters to Edith, Margaret’s loyalty to her father only allows her to be optimistic about Milton and even in describing the strike her ‘conversations’ are more marked by what she can’t disclose rather than what she can.

2) Did the script change once filming began? By the time filming begins the scripts are usually ‘locked’ after several months (years, even) of development. This is because a schedule has to be budgeted for and it is in no-one’s interest if there are scenes which are shot which turn out to be superfluous. Structurally, from a writer’s point of view, it places the story telling in jeopardy if it is thought in advance that large chunks of the script will vary as filming proceeds. This is why a great deal of work and discussion between director, writer and producer takes place before filming starts. There is also of course a rehearsal period where the actors have an opportunity to contribute thoughts as they start to build their characters . This doesn’t mean, however, that when editing begins there isn’t opportunity to reshape material . One example of this is that when we all saw the interior mill rushes and then the cut sequence of Margaret seeing Thornton for the first time. It was pretty obvious that this was the defining moment of the first episode and that we needed to get to it as soon as possible. We had shot a few more small scenes at ‘Helstone’ the largest being Mr Hale telling Margaret that he was leaving the church. This aspect of the story had given us headaches for some time, as the 13 articles and Hale’s objections to them are not clear to me even now however much I concentrate. .and somehow the simpler we tried to make Hale’s break with the church the more severe the reason appeared to be so at one point it seemed as if he must have done something really sinful! We therefore killed two birds with one stone and cut the Helstone scenes altogether except for the proposal sequence and relied on the later scene (in which Tim and Lesley are quite brilliant) to carry the weight of the ‘church leaving’ story.

Both Richard and Daniela took on their massive roles with enormous dedication and I know everyone was impressed by the way they both immersed themselves in their roles, whilst managing to be both utterly professional and a complete delight to work with.

3 More Episodes..? I’m so pleased that everyone enjoyed North and South so much that they wanted more! However, I’m not at all sure what it would be…I think that although the industrial storyline is very strong and Margaret and John’s other relationships are very strong (ie Bessie, Higgins and of course Hannah Thornton) there comes a point where their love story is the main impetus of the drama . There are not that many characters in North and South to begin with (and, as you know, several of them die in quick succession) and none of them other than the two leads and Higgins have a story of their own. I think it would have been necessary to invent something for the other characters in order to prolong the serial beyond four hours. When Margaret leaves Milton it is difficult to sustain the love story momentum particularly as at this point neither of the ‘lovers’ is talking to anyone else.

The London dinner party scene at the end of the book was always going to be ‘cut’ for very different reasons other than time…because of the cursory and frankly rather flat ending in the book we were always going to have to restructure the end of the story . However, Thornton being seen to distinguish himself in the company of ‘Southerners’ is a very useful device to show Margaret’s opinion of him changing. The London dinner party is really far too late in the story as the audience (and Margaret) are quite aware of her strong feelings for him by then. Hence the Great Exhibition Scene which not only gives us the sense of Thornton being a respected businessman but also shows us that Margaret without realising it is now emotionally somewhere in between North and South: she asks Thornton to tell her mother she will be ‘home’ soon and is not impressed with Henry’s sly attempts to get her to disparage Milton. Also, having rejected Thornton’s proposal she is now learning that Hannah Thornton’s ‘boasts’ (in Ep 1) about her son are in fact true, he does command respect as a businessman outside Milton and it is unlikely he doesn’t have a few female admirers ……which brings us onto..

4. Why Miss Latimer? I think Elizabeth Gaskell was very careful in her two proposal scenes to try to make her readers aware of what a lottery marriage was for Victorian middle class women. They could be proposed to by a virtual stranger and their only options were yes or no. It’s clear Margaret finds Henry’s proposal difficult because she does like him and resents having to reject him in such a blunt manner. Thornton’s proposal, given that the ostensible reason is that she has somehow compromised herself by defending him at the riot , also has to be rejected but she finds this a lot more painful and also her frustration at being placed in such a difficult situation makes her refusal even more clumsy. I do think it’s possible to feel sympathy for Margaret after Thornton’s proposal . She is genuinely sorry for having hurt his feelings. She is therefore even more vulnerable to seeing him in a more sympathetic light…not that she immediately regrets her refusal But she is more ready to acknowledge Hannah Thornton’s more elevated opinion of his worth.

I should make it clear that Miss Latimer as a serious rival was really only meant to be a figment of Margaret ‘s imagination. It would clearly be wrong to suggest that Thornton was in any way encouraging the idea that he would be engaged to someone else. But he is a long standing eligible bachelor and it is natural that others will speculate about his marriage plans. Mr Latimer and Fanny are the ones who openly comment on the ‘match’ and they have no idea what has happened between Margaret and Thornton. I’ve mentioned before that it was difficult to dramatise Margaret’s changing opinion about Thornton. The story arc requires Ep 3 to take Margaret from the rejection through seeing Thornton in a different light (Great Exhibition and Miss Latimer) to the Frederick story making her unable to ever confide in him. By the end of Ep 3 it is him who is saying he is moving on. Although in the book he acknowledges to himself that he will never love anyone other than Margaret, he is quite harsh to her on the subject of having regretted exposing his feelings to her and that she should not see any favour he might do her as a sign of his continued regard..there is every reason for Margaret to assume he will turn to someone else.

5. Mr Bell. I actually would disagree with your description of Mr Bell in the book. I find him quite irritating, for someone who is supposed to be so saintly he seems to be quite unable to resist having a dig at someone whatever the conversation. I find him a great deal more palatable as an honest, un-malicious dilettante who can’t help ‘stirring’. The other reason for changing him slightly is that otherwise poor Fanny is the only really lighthearted character in 4 hours of drama. There was also no intention to suggest that he and Thornton should be jealous of each other. I think at first Thornton is perfectly at ease with Mr Bell (in Ep 2 dinner party for instance he is at first quite unphased by Bell’s playfulness.) even a mutually acknowledged match for him. By Ep 4 Thornton is not really talking to anyone, he is so ground down by the failure of the mill and the loss of Margaret. I didn’t intend him to be any more curt to Bell than any other comparative stranger.

I also didn’t intend Mr Bell to be ‘lecherous’ in any other than a sort of man about town way, certainly not in any specific regard to Margaret. I think it would have been natural for him, having promised Hale that his fortune would be Margaret’s ,to have considered, when she became an orphan, what her domestic circumstances would have been had she not gone to live with the Shaws..? Would they have lived together? What would be the protocol in that situation…? Certainly both he and Hale had vaguely imagined how nice it would be to ‘be looked after’ by Margaret in their old age but not, surely, in a sexual way. Mr Bell is not a man who thinks or feels very deeply about things, he tends to think as he speaks, so (in Ep 4 revisiting Helstone ) having put words to the ‘looking after’ (and not in any way as a concrete ‘proposal’) and realising that Margaret is in love with Thornton , he quickly and gracefully passes on to more practical matters. I think Brian Protheroe managed to navigate his way very skilfully through that very long and difficult scene in Ep 4 and I’m sorry if I’ve given everyone a different idea as to Bell’s character.


6. Thornton’s violence towards Stephen’s… I know that this has generated a great deal of debate so I’ll attempt to explain myself…! Given that Margaret and Thornton’s romance is the drive of North and South it was clearly necessary to make their first meeting a great deal more dramatic than it is in the book. It was also decided that it was necessary to have Margaret actually go into the mill (as she doesn’t in the book.) I also wanted to find a way to make Milton a real shock to the senses for Margaret, in a physical way, from the ‘gentle curves’ of the south …so the opening of the carding room door was to be a massive assault on her both visually and as a barrage of noise. It is a vision of hell and Thornton is inextricably linked to that hell…although Thornton does not ‘behave badly’ in the book, the fact that he runs this hell and profits from it is something that neither we nor Margaret can ignore. I think that Thorton’s comparative ‘saintliness’ in the beginning of the book is actually a real problem ( not just to dramatise for a ‘20th century’ audience ) because it effectively torpedoes Margaret’s character in the first few scenes between them. I think even a 19th century ‘audience’ would have found Margaret (in the book)to be quite priggish and unsympathetic in her rather unreasonable dislike of someone who is after all spending a rather unrealistic amount of his busy time trying to help a total stranger look for lodgings…! We will quite soon realise that Margaret takes after her father in her unsnobbish disregard of class and her ability to talk honestly to people from all walks of life, so if anything ,it is her petulance that is somehow ‘out of character’ It seemed reckless to risk alienating quite a large part of the audience from the narrative’s main character, so early in the story…this is why we tried hard, in all departments (eg the editing of the first dinner party scene at the Thorntons ) to make Thornton as ambiguous as we can in this first episode, as if we were seeing him and Milton through Margaret’s eyes, fresh from the South and through a harsh lens.

As to whether the violence significantly ‘alters Thornton’s character,’ I’m not sure. I’m not certain where I got ‘I have a temper’ from (sometimes, after a while you can’t remember….!) but I don’t think I totally made it up. He’s certainly a passionate and impulsive man and quite impetuous ( eg the riot scene, where he certainly doesn’t behave very rationally even before the stone throwing) and I relented by giving him some very good reasons for kicking Stephens.! …I know there are some who’ll never be reconciled to this scene but sometimes, I think it’s necessary to change some moments so that the balance of the whole four hours of drama remains true to what Elizabeth Gaskell intended, even if those moments are not exactly the same as in the book…

7. Why no post riot declaration…? There are several reasons for not including the moment when Thornton carries Margaret into the mill house and declares his love for her. The first is that the pre/post riot sequence up to the proposal is quite complicated , involves practically all of our characters, so exactly which bits of it to use to get the balance right for the end of the episode was quite tricky. Also, on a practical level, most of the interiors (except for the ‘go down and face them like a man!’ exchange between Thornton and Margaret) were shot in London at the Thornton House whereas the exterior action was shot in Keighly. To have Thornton carry Margaret into the house several weeks after the rioters (and we would not have been able to have extras in the background) would have been difficult to achieve even if it weren’t for the ‘full on’ nature of the dialogue…However, I think the most important reason is that I don’t think that, at this precise moment, Thornton would admit he is in love with Margaret, even to himself. The whole nature of the ‘proposal’ is very rushed and ill thought out, it is as if the riot and Margaret’s involvement give Thornton an excuse to go and see her. It is Hannah (much to her mortification if she realised, I’m sure!) who actually strengthens her son’s resolve that a proposal is necessary and would be welcome… And the more I think about it, the more I like the idea that when Thornton says to Margaret … ’I wish to marry you…because I love you…’ this should almost come as much of a daring admission to him as it is to her…<br>

8. Why does Margaret lie to Thornton about Fred being in the house…? I hadn’t really thought about this as a’ lesser lie’ …I was wanting to emphasise the awkwardness between the two after the rejection. It is in Thornton’s nature to imagine that visiting with fruit is necessary to show his indifference. Just as it would be in Margaret’s to wish to get over all the embarrassment without anyone else knowing.There is a scene in the book where Thornton visits and Dixon gets rid of him and then Margaret finds herself defending Thornton against Fred’s disparaging comments…I think I probably thought this was too good an opportunity to miss , in terms of trying to dramatise Margaret’s changing feelings towards Thornton. It also emphasises that it is Margaret who is now destined to be misunderstood. The fact that Fred is in danger is ,she feels, her responsibility and it is her responsibility to stop anyone finding out about him. When Thornton sees her at the station he is more than ready to believe she has something to hide because she has clearly been concealing something at the house…so I think (or hope) if anything that the two ‘lies’ compound each other as opposed to one weakening the other….

9a The ending… I honestly can’t remember the answer to this one…except to say the obvious ..that I did think it was necessary to rethink the whole post –Hales death sequence of events…in fact, except for the last scene and the fact that Margaret doesn’t go to Cromer most of what happens in the book is dramatised . The main problems were to try to get enough sense of time passing and to dramatise the idea that Margaret and Thornton were in each other’s thoughts all the time…I also thought it very necessary to have a scene with Margaret and Hannah Thornton because after 4 hours of drama it would have felt very cursory to leave Hannah as she is in the book, as a sort of afterthought figure of fun.. So it made sense that Margaret should travel to Milton once she has decided to use her money to help recover Marlborough Mills. It then made sense that Thornton should go and visit Helstone, which he does do in the book but of course at a different time… The lack of jacket at the station was not scripted but was in continuity from the Helstone scenes…I think his lack of care shows Thornton’s lack of control now he has lost his job, Margaret etc and in keeping with the idea of him having a sort of breakdown

As for the ‘propriety’ of the kiss...just to go slightly off topic,. I think it’s been assumed that some script decisions have been made to make actions ‘more palatable to a modern audience…’ as if somehow, Victorians were a kind of different species to us who never acted outside what we assume to be the limits of what decorum permitted ,who always wore hats and gloves when they stepped outside the front door, which we know, of course, not to be the case…(would we be questioning the kiss in a Bronte novel?) and that a modern television audience is somehow less sensitive, less intelligent and need ‘dumbing down’ to in some way in order to understand a story, which I fiercely believe not to be the case..Indeed, I think it’s the similarities in sensibilities of people of all generations that makes the retelling of ‘classics ‘ such an enduring phenomenon, not the opposite….sorry to sound like I’m beating a drum but I’m always being asked about the ‘relevance’ of one book or the other and don’t know any other honest answer than ;’It’s a good story….

9b - To get back to the station.…! We all felt strongly that the sort of anticipation gathered by 4 hours of ‘will they, wont they’, would not be satisfied by a clasp of hands and a bit of gentle smiling… The sense of movement of the trains, the coincidence of meeting (what if they’d missed each other by 5 minutes either way…!?) the instinct that if they get back on the trains they will never meet again all add to a sense of ‘now or never’ . These two have been through an awful lot and I think we can now believe that they would have been oblivious to all around them. The last line was intended to be just that . I ‘ve been trying to remember what kind of discussion we had about this scene and I think one of the most pleasing things for me was that we didn’t really have any, except that we had to chose another location for the final scene because the length of platform didn’t leave us with long enough of the train’s interior to get the sense of the introspective nature of that final shot. And yet I personally think that all departments; directing, acting, costume, music, production ( who had to miraculously make one train into two…) etc are at their very best in this scene…

10. I can’t remember where the ‘white as hell’ came from …I think I was trying to imagine what it would have looked like in a cotton mill …Margaret is a clergyman’s daughter, after all,… Also, there was no obvious ‘cliffhanger’ for Ep One so we decided to make it about how isolated Margaret is and how lonely she is in Milton, a fact she can’t reveal to anyone…

11. And finally…although the next project is a contemporary story, I have had the ‘devil’s advocate ‘ conversation about another classic novel…however, as to whether it gets made or who might be cast in it, I’m afraid that’s always entirely a matter of all sorts of variables…needless to say, I think the entire cast of North and South were really great and I’d be thrilled at the chance of working with any of them in the future…

Once again, thanks to all of you for your enthusiasm and support.

Best wishes
Sandy Welch

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#2 2006-04-14 21:34:10

niya
Użytkownik

Re: Artykuły na temat North & South

a ze tak spytam, co to za cudowny film? bo widze, ze kazdy sie zachwyca? romans oczywiscie? jaka epoka? jakie odczucia? warto zdobyc?

pozdrowienia smile


A co się staje to się staje tylko raz w tym czasie
I tylko raz w tym miejscu...

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#3 2006-04-14 21:36:16

caroline
Użytkownik

Re: Artykuły na temat North & South

Niyu warto wink
Jeśli nie wierzysz obejrzyj ten wątek, który ma w tej chwili jakieś 65 stron wink

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#4 2006-04-15 09:20:40

Gosia
Użytkownik

Re: Artykuły na temat North & South

Artykul bedzie przetlumaczony big_smile

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#5 2006-04-15 19:41:53

Gosia
Użytkownik

Re: Artykuły na temat North & South

Artykul jest w trakcie tlumaczenia big_smile

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#6 2006-04-15 20:34:51

caroline
Użytkownik

Re: Artykuły na temat North & South

Gosia nic nie rozumiem, nigdzie więcej tego tekstu nie widzę, dlaczego chcesz go kasować?

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#7 2006-04-15 21:30:49

niya
Użytkownik

Re: Artykuły na temat North & South

Caroline, dziekuje.
a to jest nowa wersja, ktory rok? bo jeszcze "zdobede" jakies dziadostwo hmm


A co się staje to się staje tylko raz w tym czasie
I tylko raz w tym miejscu...

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#8 2006-04-16 11:56:24

caroline
Użytkownik

Re: Artykuły na temat North & South

Z 2004 roku
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0417349/
Wersja jest chyba trzecia, starsze są z '66 i '75.

Nie pomyl też z serialem pokazywanym kiedys u nas ("Północ-Południe") z '85 o wojnie secesyjnej, zupełnie inna para kaloszy big_smile

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#9 2006-04-16 16:12:33

Gosia
Użytkownik

Re: Artykuły na temat North & South

Caroline, zostal skopiowany po to zeby go przetlumaczyc big_smile
Nie moglam dac linku w temacie Napisy do N&S, bo calosc tekstu byla tylko na zamknietym forum.

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#10 2006-04-16 18:57:13

caroline
Użytkownik

Re: Artykuły na temat North & South

Gosiu to może niech temacik powisi jeszcze trochę i jak tłumaczenie będzie gotowe, to się je wklei do któregoś wątku N&S razem z oryginałem. Ktoś może chcieć poczytać sobie artykulik w takiej postaci jak jest teraz. Jak myślisz? :?:
Trochę się czuję jak blondynka, nie wiem, czy dobrze Cię rozumiem?

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#11 2006-04-16 18:58:46

Gosia
Użytkownik

Re: Artykuły na temat North & South

Wszystko zrozumialam, dobrze.
Temat nie bedzie kasowany.
Zapadla decyzja, ze bedziemy tu zamieszczac artykuly dotyczace N&S.

Juz zmienilam tytul watku big_smile

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#12 2006-04-21 13:17:08

Gosia
Użytkownik

Re: Artykuły na temat North & South

Podaje tresc swiezego artykulu o Richardzie Armitage, ktory ukazal sie w "The Independent", April 2006

Oryginal:
"An interview with Richard Armitage in The Independent, on 19th April, 2006.
Richard Armitage: Ladies beware
With 'North & South', Richard Armitage became an overnight sex symbol. Now he's playing Claude Monet in a mini-series.
By Sarah Shannon
Published: 19 April 2006

Richard Armitage strode manfully into the public eye as John Thornton, the brooding mill-owner in the BBC period drama North & South. The women of Middle England swooned at the sight of his strong but silent character. They began to behave out of character, logging on to BBC message boards to chatter excitedly about the wonders of RA, as they quickly dubbed the 34-year-old actor. In the end, the volume of chat was too great, and the BBC closed down the North & South message board. Undaunted, the devotees, calling themselves the Armitage Army, set up their own website.
Armitage's next appearance is in The Impressionists. As Claude Monet, he dominates a storyline that follows the young French artist and his friends Renoir, Degas, CĂ?zanne et al as they battle the Parisian art establishment to gain recognition for their revolutionary painting methods. How will the Armitage Army respond to this new part? It's hard to imagine that the artist's straggly wig and creative twirls of facial hair will provoke quite the same response as the magnificent Mr Thornton.
In the flesh, Armitage is charm itself. He is tall (tick), dark (tick) and handsome (tick), with piercing blue eyes (double tick). Ladies, your swoons have not been wasted. He says he has taken the decision not to read the message boards set up in his honour. "When North & South came out, I did have a little look," he admits, "but I stopped quite quickly. I was aware of that thing of believing in your own hype. I didn't want to start thinking that I mustn't do this role or people will be disappointed." Might he not have donned the Monet wig otherwise? "I hadn't thought about that, actually. I suppose it's not that attractive, all that hair and a funny beard, but when you're working from somebody real, you don't really have a say."
I can't resist quoting one example from a message board, an ode written in his honour. "There's been casualties from ovaries exploding/ And an awful lot of thudding!/ Richard only has to start his irresistible brooding/ And we all start imploding!"
"Noooooo," he wails, looking genuinely embarrassed. "What I don't get is that I didn't write the character. I suppose I get the attention because the author's dead. If Elizabeth Gaskell were still alive, they'd write to her, I think." Oh, really? I don't think the clergyman's wife from Manchester would have provoked such panting poetry.
Besides his charming modesty, Armitage does display a strain of business nous when he talks about "the Thornton effect". "It's incredibly useful to future employment. When you already have a following, people are more likely to employ you. The role definitely put me on the map a little bit, so people know I can do a certain type of part. It's opened some doors to me, but there are lots that are still closed - it's circles within circles. I'd love to work more in films, for example."
Armitage Army members are no longer confined to Britain. His website's guest book contains adoring messages from Japan, Russia, Australia, the US and more, as the drama gets sold to broadcasters around the world. The website features a message from Armitage thanking the fans for their support but warning them that any more gifts sent to him will be forwarded to his local shelter. The most memorable gift so far is an enormous pink blanket, hand-crocheted by a woman in Germany, who also sent pots of jam and honey. "That blanket kept my agent's knees warm for a while before I had a chance to pick it up," he says with a wry smile.
Armitage describes himself as reluctant rather than shy when women approach him in the street. But without Thornton's top hat and cravat as a visual clue, he mostly passes unnoticed. Surprisingly, he has failed to capitalise on the fact that he has thousands of admirers. Surely he is missing a trick. "There's nobody in particular in my life at the moment, but I have had a few dates," he says. "I'm a bit of a recluse, a bit boring, really." He looks up, worried. "Am I painting myself as a total loser?"
This non-loser grew up in a Leicestershire village, an ordinary child with a passion for stories. He attended drama school in Coventry and then joined the circus to get his Equity card before taking the more conventional route of touring in local theatre and receiving a classical education at Lamda.
It was there that he spotted a request on the noticeboard for tall men to play fighter pilots in Star Wars: The Phantom Menace. "I got incredibly nervous on the set and delivered my one line very carefully. I wondered why the crew were looking at me strangely, but when I watched the film, I realised my voice was completely computerised. I'm in one of those blooming white outfits with my face covered up."
His other lasting memory from the set was chatting up a beautiful young actress whom he believed to be Natalie Portman. She nodded politely as he called her Natalie over and over again, but when she stepped forward for her scene, Armitage realised she was Portman's body double, an unknown British actress by the name of Keira Knightley.
For The Impressionists, Armitage and his fellow actors received training from an artist on how to hold their brushes and how to paint on camera. "Monet was like a conductor. He painted with quite a straight arm and used bold strokes." The actor took advantage of a gap in the hectic filming schedule in Provence and Normandy to visit Paris and see as many original Monets as he could. "What I knew of Monet came from coasters and place mats and pencil cases. They don't bear any resemblance to the original paintings. They get so overused that you don't appreciate them for the works of art they are."
Next up for this heart-throb du jour is a role as Guy of Guisborne in Robin Hood, a BBC drama that is scheduled to fill the precious Saturday-teatime slot occupied by Doctor Who. And, as with all promising British actors, Tinseltown beckons. He's been to a Los Angeles audition for a role as a CIA agent in a television pilot. Armitage tells a story about his casting session that just about sums up this man's pleasing blend of confidence and modesty. "I'd practised my American accent really hard so I could get the part just right. When I finished reading, the casting people said, 'Wow! That was great... Now would you mind doing it again with an American accent?'"
The Impressionists' starts on Sunday 30 April, BBC1
From: http://news.independent.co.uk/people/pr … .ece"

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#13 2006-04-21 13:20:03

Gosia
Użytkownik

Re: Artykuły na temat North & South

Moje tłumaczenie, ktore wlasnie skonczylam, uffff, ale jestem dumna! big_smile
Milego czytania zycze big_smile

Panie, strzeżcie się!

Z nadejściem N&S Richard Armitage stał się z z dnia na dzień symbolem seksu. Teraz gra Claude`a Monet w serialu BBC.
Richard Armitage stał się znany publiczności jako John Thornton, tajemniczy właściciel przędzalni bawełny. Angielki mdleją na widok jego silnej, ale milczącej postaci. Logują się na forum i rozmawiają z podnieceniem o urokach RA, jak szybko przezwały tego 34-letniego aktora. W końcu czatujących jest tak dużo, że BBC zamyka forum. Nieoczekiwanie, fani sami siebie nazwali Armitage Army i stworzyli własną stroną internetową.
Kolejna rola Armitage`a to ta w „Impresjonistach”. Fabuła opowiada o młodym francuskim artyście i jego przyjaciołach Renoirze, Degasie, Cezannie i ich batalii z paryskim światem sztuki o uznanie ich rewolucyjnych metod malowania.
Jak Armitage Army zareaguje na tę jego nową rolę? Trudno wyobrazić sobie, że niesforna fryzura i twórczy zarost będą wywoływać taką samą reakcję, jak to było w przypadku wspaniałego pana Thorntona.
W rzeczywistości, Armitage jest czarujący sam w sobie. Jest wysoki (tak), ciemnowlosy (tak) i przystojny z przenikliwymi niebieskimi oczami (podwójne tak). Panie nie mdlejecie daremnie.
(Richard) mówi, że podjął decyzję, żeby nie czytać postów na forach jemu poświęconych. „Kiedy pojawiło się N&S, zajrzałem tam – przyznaje- ale szybko przestałem. Byłem świadomy tego, że mógłbym zadufać się w sobie. Nie chciałem zacząć myśleć, że nie powinienem zagrać tej roli, albo że ludzie będą rozczarowani".
Mógłby nie przebierać się za Monet’a?
„Teraz o tym nie myślę. Przypuszczam, że jest mniej atrakcyjny - te włosy i zabawny zarost, ale kiedy pracujesz z realną postacią, to nie masz nic do gadania".
Nie mogę oprzeć się, żeby nie przytoczyć pewnego przykładu z forum – chodzi o odę napisaną ku jego czci.

„There`s been casualties from ovaries exploding
And an awful lot of thudding!
Richard only has to start his irresistible brooding
And we all start imploding!”


„Są eksplozji jajników przypadki
i mrucząca głeboko mowa
niech no Richard zamyśli się - babki
w nas zachodzi reakcja jądrowa!
*

“Nooooo” – wzdycha [Armitage], wyglądając na autentycznie zażenowanego.
„ Nie biorę tego do siebie, bo to nie ja opisałem tę postać [Thorntona]. Przypuszczam, że spotykam się z takim zainteresowaniem, ponieważ autorka nie żyje. Gdyby Elizabeth Gaskell wciąż żyła, pisaliby do niej, jak sądzę”. Czy aby na pewno? Nie sądzę, żeby żona duchownego z Manchesteru mogła sprowokować do napisania tego rodzaju ekstatycznej poezji.
Mimo swojej czarującej skromności, Armitage wykazuje zmysł biznesowy, kiedy mówi „o efekcie Thorntona”. „To niewiarygodnie użyteczne, jeśli chodzi o moją przyszłą pracę. Kiedy już masz poparcie, jest bardziej prawdopodobne, że cię zatrudnią. Ta rola wyraźnie trochę mnie rozsławiła (spopularyzowała), tak, że ludzie wiedzą, że mogę grać określony typ ról. To otworzyło mi niektóre drzwi, ale jest wiele takich, które wciąż są zamknięte. To błędne koło. Na przykład chciałbym pracować więcej w filmach”.
Członkowie Armitage Army nie pochodzą tylko z Anglii. Księga gości tej strony zawiera pełne admiracji posty z Japoni, Rosji, Australii, USA i innych krajów, jako że film został sprzedany do nadawców wielu krajów. Na stronie internetowej jest zamieszczona wiadomość od Armitage`a, który dziękuje fanom za ich wsparcie, ale ostrzega, żeby nie przysyłali mu więcej żadnych prezentów, że wszystkie prezenty, które mu wyślą odda do miejscowej pomocy społecznej. Najbardziej pamiętny prezent jak dotąd to ogromny różowy koc, ręcznie szydełkowany, przysłany przez panią z Niemiec, która wysłała mu także słoiki dżemu i miodu. „Ten koc grzeje kolana mojego agenta, wcześniej ja go używałem ” – mówi uśmiechając się lekko drwiąco [ew. gorzko lub krzywo - dopisek tlumacza].
Armitage opisuje sam siebie jako bardziej niechętnego, niż nieśmiałego, kiedy kobiety na ulicy podchodzą do niego. Ale bez kapelusza i halsztuka [męskiej apaszki] jako znaku rozpoznawczego, przechodzi zwykle nierozpoznany. Ku ogólnemu zaskoczeniu , nie wykorzystuje faktu, że ma tysiące wielbicielek. Z pewnością brakuje mu wprawy. „Nie ma nikogo szczególnego w moim życiu w tym momencie, ale chodzę na randki” – mówi. „W rzeczywistości jestem trochę samotnikiem, trochę nudziarzem”. Spogląda zaniepokojony. „Czy odmalowuję siebie jako totalnego nieudacznika?”.
Ten [w rzeczywistosci] „udacznik” wzrastał w wiosce Leicestershire , jako zwykły dzieciak z zamiłowaniem do bajek. Uczęszczał do szkoły dramatycznej w Coventry i przyłączył się do zespołu cyrkowego, zanim obrał konwencjonalną drogę tournee w miejscowym teatrze i otrzymał klasyczną edukację w Lamda.

Tam znalazł na tablicy ogłoszeń propozycję dla wysokiego mężczyzny, który miał grać rolę pilota w Star Wars: The Phanton Menace. „Byłem niewiarygodnie zdenerwowany na planie i wypowiedziałem swoja linijkę tekstu bardzo ostrożnie. Zastanawiałem się dlaczego ludzie z ekipy patrzyli na mnie dziwnie, ale kiedy obejrzałem film, zdałem sobie sprawę, że mój głos został kompletnie przetworzony komputerowo. Jestem w jednym z tych śnieżno białych kostiumów i mam zasłoniętą twarz".
Inne jego niezatarte wspomnienie z planu dotyczy młodej pięknej aktorki, którą wziął za Natalie Portmann. Ona kiwała grzecznie głową, kiedy nazywał ją wielokrotnie Natalią, ale kiedy wstała na scenę Armitage skonstatował, że to sobowtór Portmann, bo to była nieznana brytyjska aktorka – Keira Knightley.
Dla roli w „Impresjonistach” Armitage i towarzyszący mu aktorzy przeszli szkolenie, jak należy trzymać pędzel i jak malować. „Monet był niczym dyrygent, malował z wyprostowanym ramieniem i używał grubej kreski”. Aktor wykorzystał przerwę w harmonogramie kręcenia filmu w Prowansji i Normandii, aby zwiedzić Paryż i zobaczyć tak wiele oryginalnych obrazów Moneta, ile tylko mógł. „Znałem Moneta z podkładek pod szklanki, piórników. Ale to wszystko nie wytrzymuje porównania z oryginalnymi obrazami. Ich wizerunki są nadużywane tak, że ich nie doceniamy, jak dzieł sztuki, którymi są.”
Następną przyspieszającą bicie serca jego rolą jest Guy de Guisborne w Robin Hoodzie, w filmie BBC, który jest tak zaplanowany, aby wypełnić cenny sobotni czas na herbatę - okienko zajmowane dotąd przez "Doctora Who". I jak wszyscy dobrze rokujący (zapowiadający się) brytyjscy aktorzy zbliża się do miasta błyskotek.
[Armitage] był w Los Angeles na castingu do roli agenta CIA w pilocie filmu telewizyjnego. Opowiada historyjkę o tej swojej sesji, która podsumowuje tylko opinię o nim jako człowieku będącym mieszanką pewności siebie i skromności. „Ćwiczyłem ciężko mój amerykański akcent, żeby dobrze zagrać tę rolę. Kiedy skończyłem czytać, ludzie z castingu powiedzieli: Wow!. To było wspaniałe…. Teraz czy możemy Cię prosić, żebyś zrobił to znowu, ale z amerykańskim akcentem?”.

* tlumaczenie wiersza: Alison. Z poezją nie dałabym rady big_smile

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#14 2006-04-21 13:32:39

ewa7
Użytkownik

Re: Artykuły na temat North & South

Gosiu takie ciacho!!!
Zaraz idę zrobić sobie kawkę i bedzie od początku
Bardzo dziekuję za te wrażenia którymi podzieliłaś się z nieangielskojęzycznymi big_smile

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#15 2006-04-21 13:33:42

Alison
Użytkownik

Re: Artykuły na temat North & South

Osobiście, Armitage jest czarujący sam w sobie. Jest wysoki (tak), ciemny (tak) i przystojny z przenikliwymi niebieskimi oczami (podwójne tak).

Ciemnowłosy (tak) czy ciemny jak tabaka w rogu (tak)? ;-)
Gosiaczku, czy to jest to do czego miałam zajrzeć? Jeśli tak, znaczy, że już jestem zwolniona?
Tak czy tak jesteś okropnie dzielnym Gosiem big_smile
A Rysiek jest strasznie fajnym i chyba jeszcze "normalnym" facetem. Może jak Colin też nie da się zwariować. Oby!


Dusza moja na zawsze zostanie dziewczyną, swoja, własna, niczyja, nie znana nikomu...

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#16 2006-04-21 13:38:44

Gosia
Użytkownik

Re: Artykuły na temat North & South

Alison, co do paru kwestii, mialam duze watpliwosci, np czy tam jest mowa o tym ze naprawde zakrywa tego swojego agenta kocem, ja tak to zrozumialam, ale nie jestem pewna?
Pare z tych watpliwosci Ci przyslalam mailem, choc dotyczyly takze fragmentu innego wywiadu.
ale zerknij na tamto co w moim liscie, jesli znajdziesz czas big_smile

Musze sie przyznać, ze jestem okropnie dumna z tego tlumaczenia big_smile
Ale jesli znajdziecie jakies bledy to chetnie poprawie.

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#17 2006-04-21 13:43:13

Alison
Użytkownik

Re: Artykuły na temat North & South

Alison, co do paru kwestii, mialam duze watpliwosci, np czy tam jest moza ze naprawde zakrywa tego agenta swojego kocem?
Pare znich Ci przyslalam, choc dotyczyly takze fragmentu innego wywiadu.
ale zerknij na tamto co w moim liscie, jesli znajdziesz czas big_smile

Dobra zajrzę. Ale jutro OK? Dziś załatwiłam sporo spraw, wpadłam do domu obejrzeć moje zaanginowane dziecko, zabandażowanego psa i lecę do pracy, a tam siedzę dziś do 20.00. Więc wrócę bez znajomości własnego nazwiska. Ale jutro z ranka siądę i poprawię co się da. Kilka zdań jakoś tak dziwnie brzmi, to zobaczę co się z tym da zrobić, to najwyżej ponanosisz jakieś sprostowanka.
To narazie buźka. Lecę gnębić studentów zaocznych ;-)


Dusza moja na zawsze zostanie dziewczyną, swoja, własna, niczyja, nie znana nikomu...

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#18 2006-04-21 13:46:29

Gosia
Użytkownik

Re: Artykuły na temat North & South

Nie umialam przetlumaczyc zdania:
"Might he not have donned the Monet wig otherwise?"
Wiec napisalam tak: "A jak z fryzurą Moneta? " co jest ogolniejsze.
Hehe, wolna amerykanka tlumacza big_smile
Ale naprawde staralam sie najwierniej, jak tylko mozna... slowko po slowku big_smile
Dzieki Ali big_smile

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#19 2006-04-21 15:59:47

Alison
Użytkownik

Re: Artykuły na temat North & South

Ale naprawde staralam sie najwierniej, jak tylko mozna... slowko po slowku big_smile
Dzieki Ali big_smile

Mam moment przerwy, więc wskoczyłam tu ;-)
Właśnie to tłumaczenie słówko po słówku jest bardzo zdradliwe i prowadzi do powstania bardzo dziwnie brzmiących po polsku zdań. Czasem dobrze jest przeczytać całe zdanie, zrozumieć jego treść i intencję autora i po prostu napisać je PO POLSKU, tak żeby dobrze brzmiało dla polskiego ucha zachowując meritum, czasem 2-3 słowa trzeba nawet opuścić, ale tłumaczenie powinno przestać byc tekstem angielskim musi być tekstem polskim, dobrze czytającym sie po polsku. Nie jest to proste, bo np. tłumacząc literaturę piękną, człowiek boi się, że w ten sposób gubi indywidualny styl autora, ale na coś trzeba się zdecydować. Ja swoje tłumaczenia czytam tuż przed ostatecznym zapisem na głos, jeśli w zdaniu wypacza się rytm, źle się je czyta, to poprawiam, żeby "brzmiało". Pewnie profesjonalny tłumacz by sie do tego przyczepił, ale Wy chyba nie narzekacie za bardzo ;-)


Dusza moja na zawsze zostanie dziewczyną, swoja, własna, niczyja, nie znana nikomu...

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#20 2006-04-21 16:38:43

Gitka
Użytkownik

Re: Artykuły na temat North & South

Gosiu kochanie jaka jestem z Ciebie dumna.
Pięknie przetłumaczyłaś, jak dla mnie to nie trzeba tam nic zmieniać (wszystko zrozumiałam) wink
Jaki ten Richard normalny aż dziw bierze, ale tak się cieszę, że jeszcze mu palma...
A swoją drogą, czy naprawdę nikt go w tej Anglii nie rozpoznaje bez tej muchy? Nie chce mi się wierzyć.
Jeszcze raz wielkie podziękowanie Gosiu tongue

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#21 2006-04-21 16:51:08

Gosia
Użytkownik

Re: Artykuły na temat North & South

Dzieki Gitka big_smile Strasznie mi milo, naprawde big_smile

Co do Richarda faktycznie wyglada na to, ze palma mu nie odbila, choc mogla, oj mogla...

Alison, jak mi cos bardzo nie pasuje, to staram sie tak zmienic , zeby po polsku bylo w miare poprawnie, choc przyznam sie, ze bardzo sie boje wypaczyc intencje piszacego czy mowiacego. Jesli po polsku brzmi dobrze, ale zmienia sens, wtedy wole przetlumaczyc doslownie.
Ale tak naprawde ja sie dopiero ucze tlumaczyc. I tak az dziw mnie bierze ze mi sie udalo i to z takim dlugim tekstem. Na szczescie nie byl taki trudny.

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#22 2006-04-21 17:56:22

Alison
Użytkownik

Re: Artykuły na temat North & South

.
Ale tak naprawde ja sie dopiero ucze tlumaczyc. I tak az dziw mnie bierze ze mi sie udalo i to z takim dlugim tekstem. Na szczescie nie byl taki trudny.

Niuńka, przecież ja też się uczę i broń Boże nie mialam zamiaru Cię pouczać :-) Po porostu podzieliłam się tym do czego doszlam mordując sie nad tymi poprzednimi recenzjami, wywiadami, a teraz z panią Gaskell.
Obie jesteśmy dzielne do nieprzytomności, nie ma dwóch zdań ;-)


Dusza moja na zawsze zostanie dziewczyną, swoja, własna, niczyja, nie znana nikomu...

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#23 2006-04-21 18:43:57

Narya
Użytkownik

Re: Artykuły na temat North & South

Gosiu dziękujemy za trud i poświęcenie wink
Po polskiemu zawszeć przyjemniej sobie poczytać big_smile

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#24 2006-04-21 22:59:41

Gosia
Użytkownik

Re: Artykuły na temat North & South

Cos tam moze jeszcze uda mi sie tu poskrobac dla Was dziewczynki wink
Dzieki big_smile

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#25 2006-04-22 08:57:52

Gosia
Użytkownik

Re: Artykuły na temat North & South

Dziekuje Alison za wniesienie poprawek do mojego tlumaczenia big_smile

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